3. Traditional Food

Portuguese Gastronomy and the influence of the Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet is a lifestyle passed down from generation to generation, covering techniques and production practices, including agriculture and fisheries, cooking and consumption of food, festivities, traditions and artistic expressions. The main characteristics of this diet include a proportionally high consumption of olive oil, unrefined cerealsfruits, and vegetables, fish, dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt). It also includes moderate wine consumption and low consumption of meat and meat products. The Mediterranean diet is considered UnescoIntangible Cultural Heritage  SpainMoroccoItalyGreecePortugalCyprus and Croatia

 

Appetizers

 

Azores caviar

From tuna to octopus, tinned or preserved fish is huge in Portugal. Sardine roe is particularly prized: For the Portuguese, it’s a delicacy. It’s a unique texture and flavour.

 caviar-português2

 

 Camarão (prawns)

Boiled, fried, peeled or with heads and all, prawns are always a great option. It’s hard to beat prawns fried with lots of garlic and some piri-piri for a full flavour punch. Keep an eye out for some of those large tiger prawns – grilled or boiled, they are totally delicious.

 Spicy-Portuguese-Shrimp-0511

 

 

Soups

 

Caldo verde (Green soup)

This is one of those iconic comfort-food dishes you find in most restaurants and at home. We’re talking about five ingredients: potato, onion, olive oil, kale and “chouriço” (a kind of sausage). It’s as simple as that.

 dsc06566-cc3b3pia

 

 Sopa da Pedra (Stone soup)

    This is one of Portugal’s richest soups and comes from the city of Almeirim, north of Lisbon. Legend has it that a hungry friar begging for alms knocked at the door of an Almeirim farm labourer’s house. When the labourer tried to turn him away, the friar picked up a stone and asked him to lend him a pot and some water so that he could make a delicious stone soup. Incredulous, the labourer and his family agreed. As the water boiled, the friar remarked that the soup would improve considerably if they gave him some lard, which they also provided. Tasting the soup at various intervals, the friar was able to obtain salt, cabbage and a morsel of smoked sausage, everything he needed to make his wholesome soup. When he had eaten it, only the stone remained at the bottom of the pot. Questioned by the family over what he would do with the stone, the friar replied that he would wash it and take it with him for use the next time he was hungry.

 Sopa-da-Pedra

 

Main Dishes

 Bacalhau (Codfish)

Salt cod is a staple in Portugal, eaten two or three times a week, in all kinds of ways, from baked with cream and potatoes (bacalhau com natas) to a cold chickpea salad (salada de bacalhau com grão-de-bico).

Cod is a staple of Portuguese cuisine and they say there is a different cod recipe for every day of the year. Salted cod, not fresh cod is used in Portugal (salting is the traditional way of preserving fish – pre-freezer days). Cod is a very versatile fish and is usually the star on Portuguese Christmas dinner tables.

 

 codfish

Carne de porco à Alentejana (Alentejano pork)

Black Iberian pigs, are reared on both sides of the border. In Portugal, the best come from the Montado region of Alentejo. Farmed in oak forests and fed on acorns, the pigs, like Japanese kobe beef, develop layers of intramuscular fat that results in a sweet, moist meat. In Portugal, pork is widely cooked confit-style, in dishes such as “rojões”, a northern favourite.

 CarnePorcoAlentejana

Salmonete (Red mullet)

Lisbon red mullet, especially that caught in the waters of the village of Sesimbra (where it feeds on a particular type of seaweed), is a top Portuguese ingredient. Fish is very important for the Mediteranean  diet.

 ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

 

 

Farinheira & alheira (two types of sausages)

During the Inquisition, Jews created two pork-free sausages that they could eat to “prove” their Christianity. They are now Portuguese classics. “Alheira” is a mixture of bread and chicken and farinheira is a smoked sausage. Although it is now sometimes made with pork fat, in the past, it was historically made with just seasoned flour.

 farinheira1url

 

Sardinhas grelhadas (grilled sardines)

By the beach, in the towns, even in the hills, grilled sardines are the epitomy of summer to most locals and many visitors. Seasoned with salt, popped on the grill and then served up with a tomato salad and new potatoes – tasty and healthy!  Wash it down with a chilled “verde” wine and you will be converted for sure. Try eating the sardines like a local – using your fingers, and on a slice of bread to catch all those Omega 3 juices.

 url

 

Arroz de Tamboril (Monkfish and Rice)

This delicacy is worth a try for the uninitiated. The Monkfish is chopped into chunks and mixed with rice, tomatoes, spices and lots of really fresh herbs.  It is so tasty and wholesome. A popular dish with locals, you will find it on the menu in many places, try a seafood restaurant for specialities. There are lots of variations on this dish – you can find Octopus Rice, Seafood rice, Codfish Rice – all delicious.

 url

 

Cozido à Portuguesa (Meat and Cabbage Stew)

This is a hearty, country dish where slow cooking allows the full impact of the flavours to hit your tastebuds. Pork, beef and chicken meat are used – all sorts of cuts – mixed with plenty of cabbage and other vegetables. A regular on Portuguese restaurants Sunday Lunch menus.

 url

 

 Feijoada (bean stew)

Another rustic dish that can be coast or country. A traditional “Feijoada” is made with pork, sausage, cabbage and beans. In the Algarve you are likely to find a “Feijoada de Búzios” – which is made with Whelks or “Feijoada de Choco”, made with cuttle fish. All are very tasty, quite filling and very healthy dishes.

 images

 

 Caldeirada  (Fish Stew)

A mixed fish stew usually containing some shellfish and white fish with potato, tomatoes, peppers and onions as the base. The secret to a good “Caldeirada”, apart from the fish of course, is the correct layering of the various ingredients so that the flavours mix properly. A generous spalsh of white wine and lots of herbs completes the recipe. Combining rich flavours, this is a very Algarvian dish and is served at the table from the large pot it was cooked in.

 Caldeirada-32

 

 Desserts

 

Doce Fino do Algarve (marzipan sweets)

“Doce Fino” are the small marizpan treats shaped and sculpted in different forms, usually fruit but also animals and even people, beautifully coloured and amazingly lifelike. Made from almond paste, they are part of a tradition that can trace its roots back to the Moorish times. An excellent dessert, they also make a great souvenir gift.

cesta de doce fino

Pastel de nata (Custard pastry)

The quintessential Portuguese custard tart. We are a nation of sugar lovers and everybody knows “nata”(cream).

Portugal’s favorite sweet treat. Small open pastries with a sweet custard filling and a caramelized sugar topping, you can find “Pastel de Nata” in every coffee shop in the land. The pastry should be flakey and light, the filling creamy, eggy and sweet. The best “Pastel de Nata” are actually known as “Pastel de Belém”, as they are made in the Belém area of Lisbon and their recipe is a closely guarded secret since the very first pastries were made in 1837. These delicious little cakes are available around the world, including China.

 

 natas

 

 

  The most important Portuguese wine regions

Portuguese wines are the result of a succession of traditions introduced in Portugal by various civilizations that lived there, as the Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Greeks and especially Romans.

Portugal has two wine producing regions protected by UNESCO as world heritage: the Alto Douro wine region, which produces the famous Port Wine and the Cultural Landscape of the Pico Island Vineyard.

The quality and unique character of their wines make Portugal a reference among the major producing countries, with a growing and outstanding place among the top 10 producers.

Minho

Minho is Portugal’s largest wine region and is situated in the northwest of Portugal, bounded on the north by the River Minho and west by the Atlantic Ocean. There are produced acidity and freshness wines (which are characteristic of the region), designations of origin and DOC “Verde” wine and “Vinho Regional do Minho”.

Minho is a region of mostly granite, rich soil in water, with a mild and humid climate of Atlantic influence. The Minho vineyard has traditions and you can follow its history back to Roman times. The vineyard is cultivated in terraces, with traces of one of the oldest forms of vineyard layout: a “hanged vineyard” in which the vines are planted next to a tree and grow supported in their branches.

In this region there are the white and red varieties.

 tipos_vinho_brancoimgres

Douro

Douro is the oldest demarcated region in the world, known for the remarkable quality of its wines and the famous Port wine, a generous wine which is at the origin of this demarcation, ordered in 1756 by the Marquis of Pombal.

This region, among others, produces some of the finest, unique and valued wines in the world.

Douro is located in the northeast of Portugal, surrounded by the Marão and Montemuro mountains. The majority of the plantations are made in terraces, carved on the hillsides of the valleys along the Douro River and its tributaries.

The soils are mainly schist although in some areas, also granitic. Although difficult to work with, these soils are beneficial to the longevity of vineyards and allows concentrated grape of sugar and colour.

The vineyard culture in the region goes back to Roman times, but it was in the seventeenth century that Port wine was expanded, because of the Methween Treaty, between Portugal and England, with a view to exporting.

The Douro vineyards create a magnificent landscape recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site since 2001.

 url

Alentejo

Alentejo is one of the largest wine regions of Portugal, with about 22000 hectares, ten percent of the total Portuguese vineyards.

Hot and dry southern region, is dominated by vast plains of poor soils. The many hours of sun and high temperatures in summer allow the perfect ripening of the grapes.

The vineyard in the region dates back to the Roman presence, after the founding of Beja. The region is divided into eight sub-regions which produce DOC wines: Reguengos, Borba, Redondo, Vidigueira, Évora, Granja-Amareleja, Portalegre and Moura. It also has a high production of Vinho Regional, which allows the inclusion of other varieties such as Touriga Nacional, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Chardonnay.

It is currently the fastest growing region of Portugal.

Madeira

The “Wood Island”, Ilha da Madeira, situated in the Atlantic Ocean became famous because of its very aromatic wine, even mentioned by Shakespeare, which came to be used as a perfume in European courts!

 Justino_Henriques_Madeira_wine,_colheita_1996

 

 

 

 

 Traditional Portuguese festivities dishes

Christmas

The traditional Christmas meal in Portugal is eaten during the evening of Christmas Eve and consists of boiled codfish with green vegetables and potatoes. This is normally followed by shellfish, wild meats or other expensive foods.

Every house has a rich table set in the living room full with traditional food, cakes, fried cookies, nuts and other goodies! Turkey is often the main dish now. Traditionally it was goat or lamb in northern Portugal and pork in the south of the country.

Also, each region traditionally has its own selection of desserts. In the northern province of Minho, rich people would have rich desserts made with lots of eggs such as “Lampreia de ovos”. Normal people would be more likely to have something like rice pudding. French toast (called “Rabanadas”) is popular throughout the country as are fried dough desserts sprinkled with sugar and cinamon like “filhós”. “Filhós” are also made differently in different regions. Alentejo province makes them with crated carrot and shapes them in balls. Beira Province makes them flat and round with just the flour and water and sometimes some orange or lemon zest to flavour the dough.

The traditional Christmas cake is “Bolo Rei” (which means “King Cake”) and is placed in the center of the table. There is also a version without candied fruit called the “Bolo Rainha”. Traditionally a broad bean and a gift (a little token) are hidden in the cake. If you get the token you are allowed to keep it. But if you find the broad bean, you have to pay for next year’s “Bolo Rei”!

People drink Porto wine, traditional liquors and eat “azevias” and “filhoses” (Portuguese biscuits and sweets). The party lasts until the early hours of the morning!

 urlurlurl

 

 

 

 

Easter

Easter in Portugal always include the “folar”, a sweet or savoury bread that comes with a boiled egg in the middle, representing rebirth and the resurrection of Christ; codfish is eaten at the main meal on Good Friday and Holy Saturday, due to the tradition of abstaining from meat until the resurrection is celebrated on Easter Sunday, which is always accompanied with the smell of roast lamb. During the Holy Week, which marks the end of Lent in the run-up to Easter, the deeply Catholic country is steeped in religious ritual and tradition, followed by all kinds of people from the smallest villages to the largest cities.

In shades of brown, pastel colors, either bright or white, the tasty almonds are the Easter widespread gift in Portugal, offered not only by bridesmaids and groomsmen to their godchildren, but also among friends and family members.

It is assumed that Easter almonds symbolize the egg, an icon of fertility and renovation, harking back to traditions that came from different locations in the country.

url    

 Portuguese gastronomy comenius Poland ppt

Portuguese version

Com um clima moderado e saudável, uma costa de pesca rica, e vales suaves e protegidos não é de estranhar que Portugal seja tão rico na produção de vinho, bem como em produtos saudáveis e saborosos usados numa gastronomia variada.

A Costa Atlântica vizinha, um paraíso tão rico em peixes e crustáceos leva naturalmente a uma gastronomia orientada para produtos marinhos. Há, no entanto, um primeiro e inevitável prato que é parte do menu diário Português: sopa. A sopa mais popular em Portugal é o “caldo verde”, verde esmeralda como a província do Minho onde foi concebida em primeiro lugar. O “cozido à portuguesa”, o “rojões à moda do Minho”, o “tripas à moda do Porto” e a “caldeirada” saborosa são alguns dos pratos mais típicos.

No entanto, vamos  dar crédito aquilo que o merece: bacalhau seco, “bacalhau”, encontra o seu lugar de honra várias vezes por semana em cada mesa. Tradicionalmente, é dito que há tantas maneiras diferentes para cozinhar (mais ou menos sofisticadas) como há dias no ano. E por último mas não menos importante, um dos peixes menos caros e mais saborosos – a sardinha , uma delicadeza essencial nos churrascos e festas ao ar livre em todo o país.

Os portugueses gostam dos seus doces! As suas especialidades incluem, pelo menos, duzentos tipos diferentes de produtos de pastelaria. Queijo tradicional também é parte da dieta Portuguesa devido à sua consistência suave e sabor delicado.

De Norte a Sul e nas ilhas atlânticas, o país é rico em monumentos e história, bem como em belas praias e paisagens de tirar o fôlego. Não podemos esquecer os bons vinhos: além do único Vinho do Porto e do Madeira, há mais de cem variedades diferentes de vinhos, que vão desde os vinhos de mesa aos especiais, todos refletindo o caráter individual de seu respetivo solo.

Portuguese Gastronomy and the influence of the Mediterranean diet

A dieta mediterrânica é um estilo de vida passado de geração em geração, que abrange técnicas e práticas de produção, incluindo a agricultura e as pescas, preparação e consumo de alimentos, festas, tradições e expressões artísticas. As principais características desta dieta incluem um proporcionalmente alto consumo de azeite, cereais não refinados, frutas e legumes, peixe, produtos lácteos (principalmente como queijo e iogurte). Ele também inclui o consumo de vinho moderado e baixo consumo de carnes e produtos derivados. (A dieta mediterrânea é considerada UnescoIntangible Cultural Heritage Espanha, Marrocos, Itália, Grécia, Portugal, Chipre e Croácia???)

Appetizers

Azores caviar

Do atum ao polvo, peixe preservado ou enlatado é enorme em Portugal. Ovas de sardinha são particularmente valorizadas: para os portugueses são uma iguaria. com uma textura e sabor únicos.

Cozidos, fritos, descascados ou com cabeça e tudo, camarões são sempre uma ótima opção. É difícil de bater camarões fritos com montes de alho e algum piri-piri. Mantenha-se atento ao camarão tigre – grelhado ou cozido, é totalmente delicioso.

Soups

Caldo verde (Green soup)

Este é um daqueles pratos reconfortantes e icónicos que se encontra na maioria dos restaurantes e  casas portuguesas. Uma receita com cerca de cinco ingredientes: batata, cebola, azeite, couve e “chouriço” (uma espécie de salsicha). É tão simples quanto isso.

 Sopa da Pedra (Stone soup)

Esta é uma das sopas mais ricas de Portugal e vem da cidade de Almeirim, a norte de Lisboa. Diz a lenda que um frade com fome pedindo esmolas bateu à porta da casa de um trabalhador de fazenda de Almeirim. Quando o trabalhador tentou mandá-lo embora, o frade pegou uma pedra e pediu-lhe para lhe emprestar uma panela e um pouco de água para que ele pudesse fazer uma deliciosa sopa de pedra. Incrédulo, o trabalhador e sua família concordaram. À medida que a água fervia, o frade observou que a sopa iria melhorar consideravelmente se lhe desse, um pouco de banha de porco. Assim fizeram. Provando a sopa em vários intervalos, o frade foi capaz de obter o sal, repolho e um bocado de chouriço, tudo o que precisava para fazer sua sopa saudável. Quando acabou de comer, somente a pedra restava no fundo da panela. Questionado pela família sobre o que ele faria com a pedra, o frade respondeu que ele iria lavá-la e levá-la consigo para usar da próxima vez que estivesse com fome.

Main Dishes

 Bacalhau (Codfish)

Bacalhau é comido duas ou três vezes por semana nas casas portuguesas, em todos os tipos de formas, desde assados com natas e batatas (bacalhau com natas) até uma salada fria de grão de bico (salada de bacalhau com grão-de-bico).Diz-se que há uma receita de bacalhau diferente para cada dia do ano. Em Portugal usa-se bacalhau salgado (salga é a maneira tradicional de conservação dos peixes – antes de se começar a proceder à congelação). O bacalhau é um peixe muito versátil e é geralmente a estrela em mesas de jantar de Natal Português.

Carne de porco à Alentejana (Alentejano pork)

Porcos ibéricos pretos são criados em ambos os lados da fronteira. Em Portugal, o melhor vem da região do Alentejo. Criados em florestas de carvalhos e alimentados com bolotas, os porcos, como a carne de kobe japonês, desenvolvem camadas de gordura intramuscular que resulta numa carne doce e húmida. Em Portugal, a carne de porco é amplamente cozinhada em estilo confit, em pratos como “rojões”, um favorito do norte.

Salmonete (Red mullet)

Salmonete, especialmente capturado nas águas da vila de Sesimbra (onde se alimenta de um determinado tipo de alga), é um ingrediente superior Português. O peixe é muito importante para a dieta mediterrânea.

Farinheira & alheira (two types of sausages)

Durante a Inquisição, os judeus criaram duas salsichas sem carne de porco que eles poderiam comer para “provar” o seu cristianismo. Estas são agora clássicos portugueses. “Alheira” é uma mistura de pão e frango e a farinheira é uma salsicha fumada. Embora sejam às vezes feitas com gordura de porco, no passado eram historicamente feitas apenas com farinha temperada.

Sardinhas grelhadas (grilled sardines)

Na praia, nas cidades, mesmo na serra, sardinhas assadas são o epíteto de verão para a maioria dos moradores e muitos visitantes. Temperada com sal, na grelha e servida com uma salada de tomate e batatas novas – saborosa e saudável! Empurre-a para baixo com um refrescante vinho “verde” e será convertido com certeza. Tente comer a sardinha como um local – usando os dedos, e numa fatia de pão para não deixar de parte os ácidos gordos Ómega 3.

Arroz de Tamboril (Monkfish and Rice)

Esta iguaria é algo que vale a pena experimentar. O Tamboril é cortado em pedaços e misturado com arroz, tomates, especiarias e muitas ervas frescas. É tão saboroso e saudável. Um prato popular entre os moradores locais, você vai encontrá-lo no menu em muitos lugares. Experimente um restaurante de peixe  e produtos marinhos para provar as especialidades. Há muitas versões deste prato – pode encontrar Arroz de Polvo, Arroz de marisco, Arroz de bacalhau – todos deliciosos.

Cozido à Portuguesa (Meat and Cabbage Stew)

Este é um caloroso, prato do interior onde a cozedura lenta permite um impacto total dos sabores no seu paladar. Carne de porco, carne bovina e carne de frango são usadas – todos os tipos de cortes – misturado com muita couve e outros vegetais. Um regular nos menos de almoço de domingo nos restaurantes portugueses.

 Feijoada (bean stew)

Outro prato rústico que pode ser encontrado na costa ou interior. A “Feijoada” tradicional é feita com carne de porco, lingüiça, couve e feijão. No Algarve é provável encontrar uma “Feijoada de Búzios” – que é feita com búzios- ou “Feijoada de Choco”, feita com chocos. Todos são pratos muito saborosos, confortantes e muito saudáveis.

 Caldeirada  (Fish Stew)

A caldeirada mista, que inclui normalmente algum marisco e peixe branco com batatas, tomates, pimentões e cebolas como a base. O segredo de uma boa “Caldeirada”, para além do peixe, é claro, são as camadas dos vários ingredientes de modo a que os aromas se misturem adequadamente. Um borrifo generoso de vinho branco e muitas ervas completam a receita. Combinando sabores ricos, este é um prato muito algarvio e é servido na mesa na panela em que foi feito.

 Desserts

Doce Fino do Algarve (marzipan sweets)

“Doce Fino” é um pequeno deleite de maçapã esculpido em diferentes formas, geralmente frutas, mas também animais e até mesmo pessoas, belamente colorido e surpreendentemente realista. Feito a partir de pasta de amêndoa, eles são parte de uma tradição que recua aos tempos dos Mouros. Um excelente sobremesa, eles também fazem um grande presente da lembrança.

Pastel de nata (Custard pastry)

A tarte de creme portuguesa por excelência. Somos uma nação de amantes de açúcar e todo mundo sabe a nata. Pequenos tartes abertas com um recheio de creme doce e uma cobertura de açúcar caramelizado, pode encontrá-las em todas as pastelarias da terra. A tarte deve ser estaladiça e leve o cremoso recheio doce. Os melhor “Pastéis de Nata” são, na verdade, conhecidos como “Pastéis de Belém” ( são feitos na área de Belém de Lisboa e sua receita é um segredo bem guardado desde os primeiros pastéis, feitos em 1837). Estes deliciosos bolinhos estão disponíveis em todo o mundo, incluindo na China.

  The most important Portuguese wine regions

Os vinhos portugueses são o resultado de uma sucessão de tradições introduzidas em Portugal por várias civilizações que viveram lá, como os fenícios, cartagineses, gregos e especialmente Romanos. Portugal tem duas regiões produtoras de vinho protegidas pela UNESCO como Património Mundial: a região vitícola do Alto Douro, que produz o famoso Vinho do Porto e da Paisagem Cultural da Ilha do Pico. A qualidade e o carácter único dos seus vinhos faz de Portugal uma referência entre os principais países produtores, com um lugar de crescimento e destaque entre os 10 principais produtores.

Minho

O Minho é a maior região vinícola de Portugal e está situado no noroeste de Portugal, delimitado a norte pelo rio Minho e a oeste pelo Oceano Atlântico. São produzidos vinhos de acidez e frescor (que são característicos da região), denominações de origem e DOC vinho “Verde” e “Vinho Regional do Minho”.

Minho é uma região de solo principalmente granítico, rico em água, com um clima ameno e húmido de influência atlântica. A vinha minhota tem tradições e pode acompanhar a sua história até os tempos romanos. A vinha é cultivada em terraços, com traços de uma das mais antigas formas de disposição da vinha: a “vinha enforcada”, em que as videiras são plantadas ao lado de uma árvore e crescem apoiadas nos seus ramos. Nesta região existem as variedades brancas e vermelhas

Douro

O Douro é a região demarcada mais antiga do mundo, conhecida pela notável qualidade dos seus vinhos e o famoso vinho do Porto, um vinho generoso que está na origem desta demarcação, encomendado em 1756 pelo Marquês de Pombal.

Esta região, entre outros, produz alguns dos melhores vinhos, exclusivos e valorizados no mundo.

Douro situa-se no nordeste de Portugal, rodeados pelas montanhas do Marão e Montemuro. A maioria das plantações são feitas em terraços, esculpido nas encostas dos vales ao longo do rio Douro e seus afluentes.

Os solos são principalmente de xisto, à exceção de algumas áreas, também graníticas. Embora difíceis de trabalhar, esses solos são benéficos para a longevidade das vinhas e permite uma uva de açúcar e cor concentradas.

A cultura da vinha na região remonta à época romana, mas foi no século XVII que o Vinho do Porto foi ampliado, por causa do Tratado Methween, entre Portugal e Inglaterra, tendo em vista a exportação.

As vinhas do Douro criam uma paisagem magnífica reconhecida pela UNESCO como Património Mundial desde 2001.

Alentejo

Quente e seca, esta região do Sul é dominada por vastas planícies de solos pobres. As muitas horas de sol e altas temperaturas no verão permitem a maturação perfeita das uvas. O vinhedo na região remonta à presença romana, depois da fundação de Beja. A região é dividida em oito sub-regiões que produzem vinhos DOC: Reguengos, Borba, Redondo, Vidigueira, Évora, Granja-Amareleja, Moura e Portalegre. A região também tem uma alta produção de Vinho Regional, que permite a inclusão de outras variedades, como Touriga Nacional, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah e Chardonnay. Atualmente é a região que mais cresce de Portugal.

Madeira

A Ilha da Madeira, situada no Oceano Atlântico, tornou-se famosa por causa do seu vinho muito aromático, mesmo mencionado por Shakespeare, que chegou a ser usado como um perfume em tribunais europeus!

 Traditional Portuguese festivities dishes

Christmas

A refeição tradicional de Natal em Portugal é comida durante a noite de véspera de Natal e é composta por bacalhau cozido com verduras e batatas. Isso normalmente é seguido de marisco, carnes selvagens ou outros alimentos caros.

Cada casa tem uma mesa rica na sala de estar completa com comida tradicional, bolos, bolinhos fritos, frutas e outras guloseimas! O peru é muitas vezes a principal prato agora. Tradicionalmente era cabra ou borrego no norte de Portugal e carne de porco, no sul do país.

Além disso, cada região tem sua própria seleção de sobremesas tradicionais. No norte da província do Minho, os ricos teriam sobremesas ricas feitos com montes de ovos, como “Lampreia de ovos”. As pessoas normais seria mais provável que tenha algo como pudim de arroz.A Rabanada (chamado de “Rabanadas”) é popular em todo o país,como sendo fatias de massa frita polvilhadas com açúcar e canela.. “Filhós” também são feitas de forma diferente em diferentes regiões. Alentejo fá-las com cenoura e molda-as em bolas.Beira torna-as planas e redondas com apenas a farinha e água e, por vezes, algumas raspas de laranja ou limão para dar sabor à massa.

O bolo de Natal tradicional é o “Bolo Rei”  e é colocado no centro da mesa. Há também uma versão sem frutas cristalizadas chamada  “Bolo Rainha”. Tradicionalmente uma fava e um presente estão escondidos no bolo. Se você encontrar o presente, está autorizado a mantê-lo. Mas se você encontrar a fava, você tem que pagar o “Bolo Rei” do ano seguinte!

As pessoas bebem vinho do Porto, licores tradicionais e comem “azevias” e “filhoses” (biscoitos e doces portugueses). A festa dura até às primeiras horas da manhã!

Easter

Páscoa em Portugal inclui sempre o folar , um pão doce ou salgado “folar” que vem com um ovo cozido no meio, o que representa o renascimento e a ressurreição de Cristo; bacalhau é comido na refeição principal na sexta-feira e Sábado Santo, devido à tradição de abstenção de carne até a ressurreição ,comemorada no domingo de Páscoa, que é sempre acompanhado com o cheiro de cordeiro assado. Durante a Semana Santa, que marca o fim da Quaresma no período de preparação para a Páscoa, o país profundamente católico e invadido por ritual religioso e tradição, seguido por todos os tipos de pessoas das aldeias mais pequenas para as maiores cidades.

Em tons de marrom, cores pastel, quer claros ou brancos, as saborosas amêndoas são o presente generalizada da Páscoa em Portugal, oferecido não só por madrinhas e padrinhos para seus afilhados, mas também entre os amigos e membros da família. Supõe-se que as amêndoas de Páscoa simbolizam o ovo, um ícone da fertilidade e renovação, remontando às tradições que vieram de diferentes localidades do país.

2 thoughts on “3. Traditional Food

  1. Portugal can be a little country but we have a great of food variety.
    Taste the Portuguese food and you´ll love it for sure!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *